Andrew Kreps Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of works by Kevin Jerome Everson, Lucy Raven, Dierk Schmidt, and Cheyney Thompson, all of whom share a deeply analytical approach to their subject material.

Kevin Jerome Everson’s works in film, painting, sculpture and photography, explore the ordinariness of everyday lives. Often adopting the stance of an observer, the works approach race, sexuality, and economic circumstances, parsing a relationship between the human body and labor. Everson’s films have previously been presented at numerous institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2015, and the Whitney Museum of Art, New York, 2011.

Lucy Raven combines photography, animation and sound in her practice to interrogate the relationship of industrial systems to image production. Over the past years, Raven has collected examples of test patterns utilized by 35mm film projectionists to calibrate projectors. Presenting these in a series of prints, Raven reveals the mechanics behind the creation of what are considered to be optimal images. A solo exhibition of her work is currently on view at the Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, through November 27, 2016.

Dierk Schmidt utilizes painting to reflect on political histories past and present in projects that often span several years. In a series of small paintings on glass, Schmidt investigates the ways in which Western institutions often make cultural objects inaccessible to the societies that created them. Schmidts work was recently included in the exhibition Nervous Systems. Quantified Life and the Social Question, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin, 2016 and Dialog der Meisterwerke, Städel Museum, Frankfurt/Main, 2015, among others.

Cheyney Thompson employs rational structures, and technological processes to examine the production and distribution of painting. His most recent series of paintings are generated by placing financial algorithms in relation to Munsell’s color system – the resulting compositions tracing a line between painting’s twin imperatives of capture and exposure. Thompson’s work is currently on view as part of Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Centre Pompidou, Paris, through February 2017 (traveled from the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York).